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Day 3 of Samvaad witnesses exchange of ideas from the changemakers of the tribal land

Jamshedpur, November 17, 2017

The third day of 4th edition of Samvaad (A Tribal Conclave organised by Tata Steel) witnessed exchange ideas from the tribal icons on the challenges faced by tribal youths in their respective regions.

Representative from the Aboriginal tribes in Australia, Mr. John Corowa addressed the audience on the struggles of the Aboriginals coping with various health issues in Australia. According to him, “Aboriginals are gripped by various health issues like heart problems, respiratory problems, diabetes and other chronic diseases. As aboriginals have limited access to primary health, it becomes imperative to strengthen the community health services. We have been promoting cultural healing platforms for indigenous peoples to improve their health standards.”

Later in the day, Ms Patricia Mukhim from Meghalaya spoke on the cultural diversity of India and the co-existence of the indigenous population along with the modern world. She emphasized on the importance of the traditional and the ancient cultural values of the tribal world. Speaking on the issue, Ms. Mukhim said, “Aboriginals are gripped by various health issues like heart problems, respiratory problems, diabetes and other chronic diseases. As aboriginals have limited access to primary health, it becomes imperative to strengthen the community health services. We have been promoting cultural healing platforms for indigenous peoples to improve their health standards.”

The day also marked by inspiring tales of Tribal youths telling their personal journey of empowerment through years of hardship from tribal land. The session titled ‘My voice, My Story’ witnessed the presence of youth participants from Sikkim where Primula Lepcha exclaimed that “Alcoholism is a big problem among tribal communities. We all, especially youth, should get together to fight this social menace. If we will not help ourselves, no one else is going to come forward to voice our concerns.” While, Ramlal Kale from Maharashtra said, “By using community forest rights we have been able to end the migration of villagers to cities in search of work. Selling of forest produce has considerably increased our village funds. We are successfully marketing custard apple and tendu from our forest.” Deepa Minj from Jharkhand added that “In the fight between adivasiyat and modernity, tribal youth have to play a major role to preserve and promote the age-old customs and traditions.”

The evening of the second day of Samvaad also witnessed a mix of cultural performances from various states which painted a colorful journey of the tribal lives through their songs and dance performances.
 
The visitors got a ‘tasty’ surprise on an overcast gloomy day at the Gopal Maidan when Chef Saibal Ghose took them through a journey of culinary delight with an array of tribal cuisines exuding the flavors of tribal India.

Audience on the third evening of Samvaad were enthralled by the performance by the Tetseo Sisters from Nagaland who belted out popular numbers from their hinterland. The dance performance by Madhu Mansuri was also noteworthy.